Major Update To Google Analytics — Action Required

Saw this on Carsonified a minute ago:

Google released a new version of Analytics which requires you to update your script and, in return, gives you a lot of goodies.  (You can keep the old one if you don’t want the goodies.  It will continue working for at least another year, but will receive no new updates, aside from (presumably) security fixes.)

New features of particular note to the ISV:

  • Track downloads and, with a little work, download completions and download times (free link to whoever figures out the best way to do this first, it is 2 AM and I am not doing Javascript at this hour)
  • Tracking access to dynamic content — Flash objects, Javascript/AJAXy elements/etc, embedded videos
  • Track e-commerce conversions better (here’s hoping it works this time)
  • New reports are getting rolled out which won’t be compatible with the old way.

Fair warning: a quick perusal of the PDF integration guide suggests that this is slightly more pain than Analytics used to be.  Nothing to be worried about if you’re a programmer, but I will be handling this project myself for my brother’s superhero novel blog.  This doesn’t require Peter Parker levels of scientific accumen but it isn’t a Hulk Smash Puny Variable project, either.

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Uncategorized

3 Comments on “Major Update To Google Analytics — Action Required”

  1. Yakov Says:

    Hey Patrick,

    Have you been able to track e-commerce conversions? I am getting zero in my Google Analytics profile — it’s just not picking them up. Since I switched to new Google Analytics code it’s not working.

    If you have a solution, could you please e-mail me what code you use on your site for the trans. part?

  2. Patrick Says:

    I haven’t updated to the new code yet, but will mail you if it works when I do.

  3. bd_ Says:

    Are you sure it tracks download completions? A quick browse through the docs doesn’t immediately turn up anything, and as I understand it, the browser security model wouldn’t give the javascript that information anyway – you’d need to have the server that’s dishing out the data track the completion time.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: